FAQ's


From time to time we are asked questions about hair care, products, product use and so forth. We've decided to share this information for some of you who may have these questions, and in addition can add as some helpful tips and tricks you may not know about.

How often do I need a Haircut?

Hair grows approx. ½ inch a month (more growth in warmer months). If you have a short or mid length cut, it will need to be cut every 4 weeks or it will lose its shape. Longer lengths will need cutting every 6-8 weeks.

How often do I need color retouch?

For a single process color, the same growth of ½ inch a month will require a touch-up in 4 weeks or less depending on regrowth and color contrast. Highlights will require 6 weeks to 14 weeks for a retouch, depending on hair contrast and amount of highlights. More highlights and contrast require sooner visits.

How often do I need to shampoo my hair?

Not everyday, it is too drying to the hair, especially chemically treated hair. Oily hair can be shampooed every other day. Normal hair can be shampooed 3 to 4 times a week. Dry hair or chemically treated hair can be shampooed twice a week—a third time can be done if using a deep penetrating conditioning treatment. It all depends on what products you are using also. Proper shampooing techniques are required to maintain a healthy scalp such as, use ball of fingers to massage scalp first and gently wash the hair—no rubbing together—it makes tangles and damages the hair.

Why and how should I use conditioner?

You should use conditioner because after shampooing you need to detangle, moisturize and replenish what shampooing, chemicals and the outside elements have taken out of the hair. It also closes the cuticle and seals the hair for better shine and health. Conditioners do not weigh down the hair—if they do you are using the wrong conditioner—seek professional recommendations according to your texture, chemical services and personal needs. How do I apply conditioners? For short hair apply only to the ends—never on the scalp. For mid to longer lengths application should start at the bottom and work it up to about 2 inches from the scalp. The hair closest to the scalp is the healthiest and really doesn’t need much conditioning. In winter months you can apply some to the scalp to help keep it from flaking or itching. Just like our skin, our scalp needs more moisture in cold months.

Why does my hair fall out?

There are many reasons why hair falls out. Let’s start with genetics. If you are predisposed to balding or alopecia (clumps, patches or all), you need to see a Doctor. Medications or Chemo can also affect fall out. Dieting or stress can also affect it. Seasonal hair fall out is normal, usually twice a year—spring and fall. Daily fall out should be no more than 80 to 100 hairs a day. This is normal. Hormones also play a part—after childbirth, in particular. One way to strengthen the hair follicle and help prevent some hair loss is to put your head upside down and massage your scalp from back to front daily. This will strengthen and nourish the hair from the root.

How do I get rid of static?

Static is caused by lack of moisture in the hair. During winter months, the air outside is cold and the air inside is warm depleting the hair and skin of moisture. You need to condition and moisturize your hair more often. Purchase professional products like leave-in conditioners and moisturizers or sprays to help eliminate static.

Why does my hair color fade?

There are several reasons why this occurs. Some people use very hot water when they shower and shampoo their hair. Hot water opens up the cuticle of the hair and releases color molecules causing it to fade. Warm or tepid water should be used for the hair. Improper choices of shampoos and conditioners—use professional products designed to maintain your color—get professional advice as to what to use. Exposure to the sun can also fade color---use professional products containing UV protection and protect the hair by wearing a hat, etc. Fluorescent lighting can also affect the hair color to fade.